PHONE & FAX

Toll Free: 1-888-797-1123
Phone: 807-822-2134
Fax: 807-822-2850

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MAILING ADDRESS

Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg

P.O. Box 717

Mobert, ON P0M 2J0

DELIVERIES
Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg
207 2nd Street
Mobert, ON P0M 2J0

Pic Mobert - NETMIZAAGGAMIG NISHNAABEG-1

HOURS OF OPERATION
Monday to Friday
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(lunch 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.)

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HISTORY

The following are excerpts from "WHO WE ARE IS WHERE WE COME FROM: A HISTORICAL CURRICULUM RESOURCE FOR THE PIC MOBERT FIRST NATION" By Yolanda Twance.

“We lived off the land…It was a good life…You were just there with your family. That's all you cared about.” (F. Brown).

According to the Elders, Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg had previously been referred to as Montizambert and Mobert but more importantly as netamising zagigun by the ancestors of the community. The term is made up of two words, netamising zagigun which translates to "first big lake from Lake Superior."

PRISONER OF WAR CAMPS

 

There were eight P.O.W. camps in the area, sometime during the 1940s.  Each camp held between fifty to seventy-five prisoners. These prisoners of war, aged eighteen to twenty years of age, cut wood for Abitibi and were considered nice people.

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

 

The people of Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg lived an active social life and parents participated in these activities with their children.  In the wintertime, people spent time outdoors skating, tobogganing and walking with snowshoes. Hockey games were played against players from Abitibi.  In the summertime, they played baseball and hide-and-go-seek.  Everyone pitched in to help build rinks and sliding hills.  Lights were strung up and some would construct their own bob sleds.

COMMUNITY ACCESS

The gravel road into the community of Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg was originally built and maintained by Abitibi.  A gate was constructed where the gravel road met Highway 17 which was also just a gravel road at that time and access into the community was controlled by Abitibi.  Although the road did not quite reach the community, people did make use of it.  

Highway 17 was built sometime during the 1960s.  Prior to this, a ferry was used to cross White Lake Narrows that could carry one or two vehicles.  In the wintertime, the cars crossed on the ice.  Eventually, a bridge was built to cross the White Lake Narrows and people from Netmizaaggamig Nishnaabeg secured employment during its construction.

Read Yolanda Twance's full Thesis here.